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Healthcare providers uniformly have resisted production of factual patient care records they claim ostensibly are “quality care” and/or “peer review” papers. But they uniformly have lost under Va. Code Ann. §8.01-413 in pending but unserved medical malpracticecases. Mary Immaculate (thrice), Riverside (twice), Sentara (once), and Carilion (once)...

Some healthcare providers strenuously deny the applicability of Va. Code Ann. §8.01-413(B & C) while suit for medical malpractice is pending. But tellingly, others have admitted its applicability, even with suit unserved. After Riverside Hosp., Inc. v. Johnson, 272 Va. 518 (2006), Riverside thrice admitted the applicability of §8.01-413(B)...

Despite refusing to comply with Va. Code Ann. §8.01-413(B) in medical malpractice, wrongful death, vehicle accident, and other personal injury cases, some healthcare providers try to avoid enforcement by companion §8.01-413(C). Their threshold argument that statutory enforcement under §8.01-413(C) constitutes impermissible litigation discovery is unfounded. Va. S....

Medical malpractice, vehicle accident, wrongful death, product liability, premises liability, sexual abuse, and all other personal injury cases depend on complete prompt access of victims to their healthcare records. That critical access is guaranteed by Va. Code Ann. §8.01-413. §8.01-413(B) requires provision of “records or papers” to...

Historically in medical malpractice cases, the defense enjoyed knee-jerk success with convincing Courts to treat so-called “sentinel event reports” differently than other “incident reports”. But that has changed this decade, and stands to erode further in the face ofRiverside Hospital, Inc. v. Johnson, 272 Va. 518 (2006),...

Following the landmark case of Riverside Hosp., Inc. v. Johnson, 272 Va. 518 (2006), handled by Avery T. “Sandy” Waterman, Jr., Esq., healthcare providers routinely are being forced to provide their incident reports and other investigative materials for medical malpractice cases. Toward stemming the changing judicial tide, some...

Patients have a fundamental right to know the facts of what a commissioned third-party did to his or her body and mind. Patient care inherently is an invasion of privacy interests, the medical malpractice of which denies life, liberty and/or the pursuit of happiness. Because these patient...

“The protection provided by § 8.01-581.17 is a qualified privilege similar to the privilege afforded by Rules of Court 4:1(b)(3),” observed Justice Lemons in Stevens v. Lemmie, 40 Va. Cir. 499, 512 (Petersburg 1996)(Lemons, J.)(emphasis added), a medical malpractice case. The limited privilege for certain “committee” communications pertains only “unless...

The last sentence of § 8.01-581.17(C) provides another broad exception that negates any privilege for routine incident reports, electronic incident data, sentinel event reports and investigative materials in medical malpractice cases: “nor shall this section preclude or affect discovery of or production of evidence relating to hospitalization...

The last sentence of § 8.01-581.17(C) provides a broad exception negating privilege for routine incident reports, electronic incident data, sentinel event reports and investigative materials in medical malpractice cases. “Nothing in this section shall be construed as providing any privilege to the hospital medical records...